Watching Women in the KSA - The Ex-Muslim

I am a middle aged American woman who has been living in KSA for the past 11 yrs. I can honestly say that I found your article very biased and racist. Seems to me that you are profiting from the current anti-Islam/anti-Muslim hype. I was a bit nervous about moving here but found that the majority of the people here are just like everyone else, they are worried about making a living and raising their children. I don't live in one of the "Western" style compounds either and through work, classes and my children's friends I have met Saudis from all different levels of society. Of course there are women in KSA who are unhappy with their lives due to abuse, philandering husband, not being able to drive,etc. But, aren't there women in every country in the world who are unhappy with their lives for one reason or another? I lived the majority of my life in the U.S. and know that there are women being abused, cheated on and raped there, too. Saudi Arabian men aren't the only men in the world with undesirable behaviors. You mentioned many times about Saudi women being "forced" to wear Islamic clothing and I just want to mention that I have many female Muslim friends of all nationalities and they wear Islamic clothing because it is a religious requirement not because their husbands or fathers force them to wear it. I noticed in your article that you usually throw in a couple of good comments after a long string of negative remarks. Seems like a weak attempt on your part at being fair and unbiased. I agree that there are a lot of abusive cheating men here, as well as a lot of women who would like some changes made to make their lives easier. But, you can't generalize as you have and make all Saudi men sound like, as you wrote, a bunch of "sex mad pigs" and the women like meek, timid wimps, on the contrary most Saudi women are strong and aggressive. It's amazing to me that so many people who read your article just accepted everything you said as the "gospel truth". I guess that it is unfortunately true that most people believe whatever they see on tv or read. I am interested to know if you plan on doing anything to help all of the Saudi women improve their situations or if you just like to write exaggerated racist articles?

In 1932 the two kingdoms of the Hejaz and Nejd were united as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

I am a middle aged American woman who has been living in KSA for the past 11 yrs. I can honestly say that I found your article very biased and racist. Seems to me that you are profiting from the current anti-Islam/anti-Muslim hype. I was a bit nervous about moving here but found that the majority of the people here are just like everyone else, they are worried about making a living and raising their children. I don't live in one of the "Western" style compounds either and through work, classes and my children's friends I have met Saudis from all different levels of society. Of course there are women in KSA who are unhappy with their lives due to abuse, philandering husband, not being able to drive,etc. But, aren't there women in every country in the world who are unhappy with their lives for one reason or another? I lived the majority of my life in the U.S. and know that there are women being abused, cheated on and raped there, too. Saudi Arabian men aren't the only men in the world with undesirable behaviors. You mentioned many times about Saudi women being "forced" to wear Islamic clothing and I just want to mention that I have many female Muslim friends of all nationalities and they wear Islamic clothing because it is a religious requirement not because their husbands or fathers force them to wear it. I noticed in your article that you usually throw in a couple of good comments after a long string of negative remarks. Seems like a weak attempt on your part at being fair and unbiased. I agree that there are a lot of abusive cheating men here, as well as a lot of women who would like some changes made to make their lives easier. But, you can't generalize as you have and make all Saudi men sound like, as you wrote, a bunch of "sex mad pigs" and the women like meek, timid wimps, on the contrary most Saudi women are strong and aggressive. It's amazing to me that so many people who read your article just accepted everything you said as the "gospel truth". I guess that it is unfortunately true that most people believe whatever they see on tv or read. I am interested to know if you plan on doing anything to help all of the Saudi women improve their situations or if you just like to write exaggerated racist articles?


Women do not have equal rights to men in the kingdom.

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Smoking is associated with lower weight (25). We did not see this pattern in KSA. However, smoking rates among women in KSA were low. Similarly, fruit and vegetable consumption were not associated with obesity in our study. These findings differ from those reported elsewhere, because an increased daily consumption of fruits and vegetables is often associated with a decreased risk of obesity (26). Increased meat consumption, on the other hand, was associated with an increased risk of obesity among men. One explanation is that our participants might have misreported their fruit and vegetable intakes. Another explanation is that as Saudis increased their consumption of fruits and vegetables, they did not account for their total caloric intake.