The declining value of a high school diploma

The value of a High School Diploma should be a lot. The reason why is because without it you cannot get a good job and provide money for yourself. I believe that getting a job and providing money for yourself plays such an important part of our lives, because our moms and dads are not going to be here for long so therefor the value of a high school is absolutely crucial.

 shared the value of a high school diploma in finding a job. He wrote…

I think the value of a high school diploma is important because it means you stayed in school and at least put the effort into passing your courses. I think it is important, but you can measure the most effort with GPA and extracurriculars. It is important to obtain it, so you start working. It is the milestone of your high school career and allows you more opportunities.


The Value of a High School Diploma - The New York Times

The Signaling Value of a High School Diploma | RAND

The value of a high school diploma is getting into a good college. It is a really important thing you can get in life. It also can get you into a good job. When you have a high school diploma you can do much more in life than without it. It would be so hard to do things during your lifetime without a diploma. #MissTee 4


Though it may seem like a cliche, the value of a high school diploma cannot be overstated. Graduating from high school offers tangible career benefits as well as intangible value to the holder. While higher education often leads to even greater career opportunities, for some, graduating high school is a major accomplishment.What's the value of a high school diploma? People with high school diplomas earn an average of $280,000 more over the course of their work life.What's the value of a high school diploma? People with high school diplomas earn an average of $280,000 more over the course of their work life.But a new investigation by NPR finds reasons to question that number. Their reporting found that the value of a high school diploma can vary widely between, and even within, states. In just nine states and the District of Columbia, students must complete required classes to be considered “college-ready” and to earn a diploma. Twenty-three states allow students to opt in, or out, of a more rigorous path to graduation.