the vietnam war essay conclusion on the vietnam war essay

Gerster and Bassett assert that "whatever their earnest historiographical intentions" may be, much of the literature written about the Sixties , "are contrived exercises in myth-making" . This essay argues that the historical accounts and assessments, not only of the Sixties as a whole, but parts from that period, which, for the purpose of this essay, will be the Vietnam War and opposition to it, have also become "buttressed by conflicting myths" . The reasons why the term 'myth' will be applied to those different arguments concerning the amount of credit anti-war movements can hold, for ending Australian and American involvement in the Vietnam War are as follows. Firstly, the application of the word 'myth' suggests that some aspects of that era have been blown out of proportion or, have taken on connotations that may not be entirely correct. Secondly, while such myths may not be wholly true, they are nonetheless important, as they "inform part of (the) historical understandings of the war", and opposition to it . An analysis of the different myths regarding the extent to which anti-war movements can hold credit, for ending Australian and American involvement in the Vietnam War will be undertaken. This essay will argue that because such a large and wide range of works written about the anti-war movements exist, and, in particular on the amount of credit they can hold for ending Australian and American involvement in the Vietnam War, shows that these movements are integral to our understandings of not only the Vietnam War and opposition to it, but also the social, political and economic environment that shaped the Sixties decade. This essay contends that the Vietnam War had different effects on Australian and American society - for example, American involvement in the war was far greater, military casualties were higher...

essay on The Vietnam War vs. the War against Terrorism


Did the United States win or lose the Vietnam War?

essay on The Vietnam War