Climate change and disasters in pakistan

Globally, the risks, vulnerabilities and impacts induced by natural hazards and disasters are on rise. Their economic costs and damage are widespread as seen in recent disasters such as the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake, and Japan's 2011 tsunami. Many government agencies have utilized disaster management principals in an attempt to minimize the impact of disasters. Research has underscored that local level vulnerability assessment; disaster management and resilience are required to empower com-munities to cope with disasters.
Geographically Pakistan is situated in a region very much prone to natural hazards, particularly the northern part of the country. The area experiences natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, floods, glacial melting and soil erosion. Flooding from river overflows is the most common natural disaster in Pakistan. They are costly natural hazards due to damage to property and croplands.
Historically, disaster management in Pakistan was focused on the ‘Emergency Response Paradigm’ (ERP). Prior to 2005, the West Pakistan National Calamities Act of 1958 was the available legal remedy that regulated the maintenance and restoration of order in areas affected by calamities and relief against such calamities. An Emergency Relief Cell within the Cabinet Division has been serving since 1971 as an institutional disaster relief support at the national level
The United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) introduced the paradigm shift from a reactive to a proactive approach in the form of the Hyogo Framework of Action (2005-2015) signed by 168 countries including Pakistan. To fulfill the global obligations as well as cope with the challenges emerged in the aftermath of the October 2005 earthquake; the Government of Pakistan promulgated the National Disaster Management Ordinance in 2007 to introduce a comprehensive National Disaster Management System in the country. The Ordinance became the Act called the National Disaster Management Act in December 2010.
The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) was subsequently established in 2007 in line with the Act, and serves as the implementing, coordinating and monitoring body for disaster risk management at the national level. NDMA in collaboration with national and international partners had been in the process of strengthening the DRM system in the country and has developed National Disaster Management Plan.
The structure of disaster and emergency management in Pakistan, centered on the National Disaster Management Commission (NMDC), was established immediately after the disastrous Kashmir Earthquake in 2005. The provincial government has the authority to form the Provincial Disaster Management Authority (PDMA). A District Disaster Management Authority (DDMA) can be established by Provincial governments in the hazard prone areas on a priority basis.

Climate change and disasters in pakistan

Nowadays I m thinking about the natural disaster and their solutions and mean while I make a decision to write something on this topic through the film annex, because only film annex is the platform in my life where I share my feelings and the problems and important events of my country. Today I am going to discuss the natural disaster in Pakistan because Pakistan has to face the problems of natural disaster about every year.


Climate change and disasters in pakistan

Climate change and disasters in pakistan

1990: Worst rail disaster in Pakistan’s history kills 307 people and wounds 700 when a passenger train crashes into stopped freight train in Sangi.