An unexamined life is not worth living.

The assumptions of rationality are not knowledge.
Rationality might assume "an unexamined life is not worth living" although we have no knowledge what "life" really is.

An unexamined life is not worth living.

Plato was credited with the quote, "An unexamined life is not worth living", in this column. It does, indeed, come from Plato's Apology, which is a recollection of the speech Socrates gave at his trial. Socrates is attributed with these words after choosing death rather than exile from Athens or a commitment to silence.


An unexamined life is not worth living.

"An unexamined life is not worth living." - Socrates

The quote "An unexamined life is not worth living" was published in Plato's "Apology." Sometimes called "The Apology of Socrates," this book contained Plato's recollections of Socrates' last speeches.


"On one hand, he denies having any kind of specialized knowledge, and on the other hand, he makes assertions"The assumptions of rationality are not knowledge.
Rationality might assume "an unexamined life is not worth living" although we have no knowledge what "life" really is. Through out generations, mankind has been asking themselves what is the purpose of life. And obviously, it would not easy for one alone to answer or explain what the meaning of life is. Nevertheless, one's life is monotonous if it is meaningless, and it is not monotonous if it has a purpose, a target to go. Thus, the question here is how one knows that his life is worth living or not? Socrates, the father of ancient philosophy, once stated, "An unexamined life is not worth living." In order to make one life becomes worth to live, this famous statement strongly addresses that one must exanimate himself first and then others in the society to find the meaning and happiness of life.